Estuary Magazine Writer Wins Journalism Award

Spend a minute watching a mute swan go airborne. These stunning birds, who often gather at the mouth of the Connecticut River, are so big they need 100 feet or more to get up and go.

Wildlife Wonders: Red-breasted Merganser

Spend a minute watching a mute swan go airborne. These stunning birds, who often gather at the mouth of the Connecticut River, are so big they need 100 feet or more to get up and go.

Speaking up for mute swans despite controversy

Spend a minute watching a mute swan go airborne. These stunning birds, who often gather at the mouth of the Connecticut River, are so big they need 100 feet or more to get up and go.

Estuary for Young Readers

I put my hand out in front of me like I’m offering to shake and say: “How do you do, sir. I’m called JJ, just like my father, and his father, and his father before him. We’re all ferrymen here in Old Saybrook, and we’re all called JJ.”

What’s for Dinner? – Turkey Pot Pie

Yum yum summertime…and what better way to celebrate than to have a barbeque! Our choices are diverse, but let’s focus on what’s fresh and readily available at this time of the year. What comes to mind? … Corn and tomatoes, which can be prepared with a minimum of fuss…and what a delight to the eyes as well.

Rowing

Dating back to the 1800s, it’s been an image tied to the Connecticut River: rowers in shells—long, impossibly slim boats—cutting through the water, powered by four or eight students, each hauling on an oar and steered by an ever-encouraging coxswain.

Gamboling on the Frozen River

It was always colder way back when, back in the day, at least according to the ancient ones—generations of parents and grandparents. It turns out they were correct.

Below the Surface – Restoring Fish Runs

It seemed like just another spring day when we stopped at the Salmon River, a tidewater tributary of the Connecticut River that splits the towns of Haddam and East Haddam, Connecticut.

Duck Hunters

The Hartford portion of the Audubon Christmas bird count is unlike any other in the Connecticut River Watershed.

Snowy Owls

Snowy owls have always fascinated me. Not only are they stunningly beautiful, but I’ve heard they are incredibly fast, powerful predators.

The Hunter-Conservationist

By John Buck Walking slowly through the forest of sugar maple, white ash, and yellow birch, our path skirted the edge of a farm field abandoned long ago. My good friend Tim and I were in the wee hours of daylight of our first outing during Vermont’s Ruffed Grouse season. Even stronger than our high regard for this forest-dwelling, chicken …

My Ride Down Hog River

I knew it was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity the minute I got the call—a chance to go where few people have been before without leaving Connecticut.

Invasive Plants – Oriental Bittersweet

By now, knowledge that invasive plants are bad news is pretty widespread. Numerous articles and agencies cite “billions of dollars” in damages annually to agriculture and fisheries; they are the “leading cause” of population decline and extinction in animals.

Searching for Sol LeWitt

The author walks in front of a Sol LeWitte wall drawing #1105 “Colored bands of arcs from four corners.” Below: Barolo’s Chapel in La Morra, Italy (exterior and interior). Image Credit: Jack KeaneBy Eric D. Lehman Many years ago, after attending a play at the Goodspeed Opera House, my wife, Amy, and I walked into Chester’s River Tavern. We were …

From the Publisher- Black Duck

I’ll not dwell on the wonderful testimonials to the first issue…only to say they were as intimidating as they were gratifying as we realized how this second issue, with its theme of recreation, would be measured against the first. Once again, we count on our readers to tell us how we did, and always, how we can do better. We also look forward to submissions of articles and photos through our website at estuarymagazine.com.

Autumn

Fall is for walking, and among the many attractions in the lower Connecticut River Valley are the numerous and varied trails in the 1,000-acre Preserve, which one
can enter from the north via Ingham Hill Road in Essex, where there is public parking.

Deerfield River

With a largely undeveloped watershed stretching from the Green Mountains of Vermont to the Berkshire Hills and Pioneer Valley in western Massachusetts, the Deerfield River is one of New England’s most picturesque and historically significant waterways.